Wednesday, August 19, 2015

being a tourist

Although I am lecturing and teaching a 3 day class in Anchorage, I am in Seward, sightseeing with Nan Thompson, who brought me here.  Seward is a 2 hour drive from Anchorage and along the way, we stopped periodically so I could take pictures and walk around a bit.  I have been getting an education about Salmon, the glaciers, and other things.  Fascinating!  

Somebody needs to send all those climate change non-believers up to Alaska.  The white and blue section in the middle of those two mountains is a glacier.  Nan tells me that 20 years ago, the glacier came all the way down to the water and you could see the ice breaking off and floating away.  Now, the glaciers have receded all over the place and they are getting smaller because they are melting.
This is another glacier, also farther away than it was originally - but clearer, anyway.  By this time, the clouds had begun to lift.

We stopped to take a walk and Nan thought I should get off the path and experience walking on the tundra.  There is ice under the tundra, way down.  But the earth is very spongy and it is a strange feeling to walk on the tundra.  I don't know whether you can see my foot sinking down a little bit, but here is the photo I took. 
It is very beautiful here. and the mountains make me think of when I lived in Boulder.  Interesting about the plants that grow here: there are far fewer species here than it the lower 48 because of the light and the cold.  Plants that survive here need to be able to grow in low light and survive the winters. so they are somewhat limited by those two things.  I already forget what these are called, but they are all over the place, and such a stunning color.

Our last stop en route to Seward was to see the salmon spawning.  They lay their eggs and then they die.  These salmon have come home and are going to spawn.  There were lots of them in the water.

Today's tour is over.  I'm taking a day cruise tomorrow and promise more pictures.   Meantime, I have some catching-up to do with my sleep. My body thinks it is 1:am, although it is 9:pm (and still daylight).

5 comments:

Marianne said...

Comme cela ressemble à mon pays en dessus de 2000 mètres et les fleurs sont des épilobes magnifiques fleurs. Bon séjour

Sandy said...

Ha! My youngest sister lives in Talkeetna, Alaska. 2 hours north from Anchorage. she goes to Anchorage for her big shop.

The wild flowers are 'fire weed'. They grow in Maine (where I grew up) and they also grow in the UK https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamerion_angustifolium
Hope your classes go well.
Sandy

Linda Hicks said...

Thanks for the tour! Looking forward to hearing more.


fireweeddyeworks.com said...

Your Alaskan fans are so glad you are here and are looking forward to your lecture and class!

Deb Hardman said...

The pink flowers are Fireweed. My favorite! So glad you are here!